you will submit a final paper (14–15 double-spaced pages) on either a preexistin


you will submit a final paper (14–15 double-spaced pages) on either a preexisting dispute or a dispute that you have observed or researched. The topic must be cross-cultural. The topic is preferred to be difficult in nature, and topics that have directly impacted your life are preferred. You should try to take an impartial perspective on this topic until you reach your conclusion. Here are the proposed sections:
A. Introductory: Introduce the parties to the conflict and why you chose this topic.
B. Dispute: Describe the conflict here. What started the conflict, why is it difficult? And, what are the different cultures at play in this conflict?
C. Analysis of the Conflict from a Cross-Cultural Lens: Having gone through the cross-cultural training, how would you handle the conflict differently? How would you apply the class readings and lessons to this dispute if the dispute is active and if you are the mediator?
D. Conclusion
LET ME KNOW WHAT TOPIC YOU WANT TO WRITE ON SO I WILL APPROVE IT
IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS LET ME KNOW
this is a new paper; you will submit a final self-reflective paper (2–3 double-spaced pages) answering the following:
A. What do you think are the key skills to be an effective cross-cultural dispute resolver and why?
B. After this class, how would you influence a given (current or past, personal or professional) cross-cultural situation differently?
List of Required Readings: you need to use as much as possible from these readings.
• Goh, Bee Chen, et al., “As We See It,” in Educating Negotiators for a Connected World: Volume 4 in the Rethinking Teaching Series, DRI Press, 2012.
• Bernard, Phyllis E. “Finding Common Ground in the Soil of Culture,” in Rethinking Negotiation Teaching: Innovations for Context and Culture, DRI Press, 2009.
• Barkai, John, “What’s a Cross-Cultural Mediator to Do? A Low-Context Solution for a High-Context Problem,” Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 10, no. 1, 2008, pp. 43-89. Unit 3
• Tressler, David M., “The Soldier and the Sheik: Lessons from Negotiating in Iraq,” Harvard Negotiation Law Review, vol. 13, no. 1, 2000, pp. 67-130. Unit 4
• Lee, Ilhyung, “The Law and Culture of the Apology in Korean Dispute Settlement (With Japan and the United States in Mind),” Michigan Journal of International Law, vol. 27, no. 1, 2005.
• Chu, John, “The Art of War and East Asian Negotiation Styles,” Willamette Journal of International Law and Dispute Resolution, vol. 10, no. 1, 2002, pp. 161-96. Unit 5
• Love, Lela, & Singh, Sukhsimranjit, “Following the Golden Rule and Finding Gold: Generosity and Success in Negotiation,” in Educating Negotiators for a Connected World: Volume 4 in the Rethinking Teaching Series, DRI Press, 2012. Unit 6
• Shachar, Ayelet, “Privatizing Diversity: A Cautionary Tale from Religious Arbitration in Family Law,” Theoretical Inquiries in Law, vol. 9, no. 2, 2008, pp. 573-607. Unit 7
• Singh, Sukhsimranjit, “Beyond Foreign Policy: A Fresh Look at Cross-Cultural Negotiations and Dispute Resolution Based on the India-United States Nuclear Test Ban Negotiations,” Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 14, no. 1, 2012, pp. 105-51.
• Singh, Sukhsimranjit, “Cross-Cultural Mediation Story,” ABA, 2016.
Preparation, attendance and participation are key to learning in any context. Attendance is required at all class meetings.


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